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Chromebooks Just Outsold Windows Laptops For the First Time

Data from industry analysts show a bumper Q2 for all notebooks

Chromebooks have outsold Windows notebooks for the very first time, new data from NPD Group reveals.

US Business-to-business (B2B) sales* of notebooks running Google’s Chrome OS passed 50% between June and early July 2015, with overall education season sales up almost 40% over the same period last year.

‘Notebooks running Google’s Chrome OS passed 50% between June and early July’

It marks the first time of any sales period (so far) that demand for Chromebooks have outstripped that for Windows laptops.

It’s not just Google’s gain, however. Sales of all notebooks have risen sharply, bucking expectations.

Windows notebooks were up 6% — showing that Windows 10 wasn’t a concern for buyers — and Macbook sales rocketed 42% for the same period.

“The results from the end of Q2 and the first half of July are good news for all the major notebook platforms,” Stephen Baker, vice president of industry analysis at The NPD Group, Inc, says in a press release trumpeting the stats.

“MacBooks grew the most of any platform, and Google saw Chrome rise to take the number one spot in market share.”

Although business sales do not include sales to regular consumers the overall trends they represent are usually in keeping.

*An example of B2B sales would be Walmart buying 10,000 Chromebooks from Acer. Sales figures from Walmart selling those 10,000 Chromebooks to consumers would be counted as Business to Consumer (B2C). 

  • Ayush Shenoy

    Now that is a new low, even for Microsoft.

  • Wow. That is amazing!! :DD

  • GelisGelis

    Great news. I really looking forward to the next Google event (september) where android M is released, and hopefully more news for chromebook.

    • Don’t think you’ll be waiting that long ;)

      • WHAT DOES HE KNOW?!

        • GelisGelis

          I’m a girl!!!

          • Eleuin

            think they are talking about Joey

          • I think you misunderstood, I wasn’t referring to you :)

        • Wolfie

          Right? lol.

          I’m very excited about the next light up of Nexus devices along with Android M. Sadly Google I/O didn’t really talk about Chrome that much if at all iirc.

      • GelisGelis

        Is the next google event on september?

  • Rich

    Annoyed to see macbook sales grow because a lot of people who buy them don’t need them. They really do it out a lack of knowledge. A lot of students at my university have a pricey macbook but only use it for word processing and web browsing.

    • Bluegrapes

      I’m not sure about the macbook airs but the retina macbooks have really nice displays. Nothing wrong with getting the macbook retinas if they can afford them.

      • Gerrit Harteveld

        I think the retina’s are overcompensating for the crappy 720p Macbook air screens.

  • James Bell

    So basically more Chromebooks have been SHIPPED to retailers. This could just be because they were waiting for Windows 10 to order more Windows notebooks. I want to see consumer sales numbers.

    • Not just to retailers, no. To businesses. Retail is just one type of business.

      And retailers are aware of inventory coming down. They were, during the first half of this year, continuing to buy MORE Windows notebooks than before, despite knowing Windows 10 was coming (the free upgrade policy offset a lot of hesitation, I guess).

      So this isn’t a case of Chromebooks had a good few months because of Windows, because Windows has had a better than expected time too.

      • Wolfie

        Couldn’t have said it better myself. Great response Joey and James.

    • bmarkovic

      B2B sales figures, as a rule, don’t include retail as these are typically reported as B2C figures. I don’t know what kind of standard this report uses, but it does explicitly say B2B, most likely meaning these are sales from resellers to end user business customers (i.e. enterprise and SME sector).

  • Sean Lumly

    I wish that I could say that this was surprising, but this is fine justification for the naysayers that lambasted me for expressing the superior attributes of the Chromebook and the economic advantage based on price. And expect these numbers to rise as hardware selection improves, app selection improves, and people start spreading their purchases via word of mouth.

    I expect that Chromebooks will soon eat into Macbook sales as well. The UI is arguably prettier, and they are far easier to use.

    • ARB

      You suggest that Chromebooks will eat into Macbook sales “as well”, as if the article doesn’t clearly state that Chromebooks haven’t even started eating into Windows notebook sales yet.

      Mind you, they are making substantial leads in one of Apple’s key markets (education), which could easily be a substantial blow to them alone.

      • Sean Lumly

        It didn’t have to state this, it can be logically inferred. Assuming the number of sales for laptops is not increasing (and it isn’t — it has been declining for some time), then Chromebooks, a distinct competing device of this market has but one option if it is to increase sales: to eat into the sales of its competitors that are neither stagnant nor increasing themselves.

        • bmarkovic

          Except that article pretty clearly says that notebook market is, in fact, unexpectedly up 6%

          • Sean Lumly

            I responded to point in an earlier post in this thread. In short: these numbers are an instance in time. Chromebooks are trending upwards in sales year-over-year while the market has been shrinking for some time (despite this momentary uptick); it is earning its market shares from its competitors.

          • bmarkovic

            I’m not sure that the uptick is momentary. I think that the dip in PC/notebook sales is slowly reaching a plateau. Consumers are happy with their iPads but businesses still need PCs.

          • Sean Lumly

            Time will tell. Of course, Chromebooks are growing much faster than even the rate of this momentary rise. I have little doubt that they will continue to do well into the future.

            I expect a large part of their growth to come from emerging markets, where the competition may have a harder time hitting the price-points of low-end devices.

          • bmarkovic

            Don’t think so. I live in a small country with one of lowest (if not the lowest) purchase parities in Europe. People with low income either opt for used laptops imported from corporate writeoffs in Switzerland and Germany (a big business here), or low-end OS-less laptops/PCs that then typically get pirated WIndows on them.

            It’s chromebooks that are having hard time here as they fail to undercut used laptops, and they don’t undercut low-end laptops low enough to sell well. Windows netbooks also have a hard time selling here. 15,6″ is still the dominating form factor and will likely remain so in foreseable time.

            I expect Wintel notebooks to still dominate emerging markets in following couple of years.

          • Sean Lumly

            I don’t doubt that, however, that scenario doesn’t necessarily represent a global truth. I stand by my prophecy that Chromebooks sales will increase in developing nations (eg. China, African states, South American states).

            Be careful with your wording. I’m not stating that windows PCs will cease to dominate in the coming years, but a prediction that Chromebooks will increasingly eat their marketshare.

            Are you refuting this? Are you of the belief that Chromebooks sales will not continue to rise in a “plateaued’ market, despite their historical trend?

          • John McCourt

            people buy chromebooks for the cheap hardware and put another OS on them.

          • Charlie Whitman

            Arm based Chromebooks can’t easily run anything else except Linux in addition under Crouton, and Intel based ones can only run Linux directly (if they have SeaBIOS) or Linux under Crouton.

          • bmarkovic

            No I’m only refuting the “in developing nations” part of your statement. Two reasons: Rampant, unsanctioned piracy makes all software uber cheap, and there is no strong desire for “limited in features but easier to use and mantiain” in computing in developing world. There is strong desire to learn, to acquire more and most applicable IT skills (and this is the primary reason parents purchase computers, think western world in the 80s) to combat the order of magnitude higher unemployment than west has seen in the worst days of recent recession. Chromebooks, much like Apple products, with their SoCal-centric business model(s) simply don’t tackle these two primary (or any other) reasons of Microsoft dominance in developing world.

          • Sean Lumly

            Your argument seems reasoned though extremely narrow in its characterization of literally continents of people. In the end it is just a guess as is mine, and only time will tell. I stand by my prediction, informed by an aggressively increasing trend.

            When the numbers come out (and provided you remember this conversation), please follow up with me, as I would be interested to see how it all turns out!

          • bmarkovic

            I know it because I’ve discussed this with numerous people over the net, and finally read about it from more sources, not just media dominating SoCal ones. There are, essentially, just three IT worlds. The US and Canada, the developed West which is different than the US/CA, and the developing world (Eastern Europe & Middle East, BRICS and Latin America). I never had chance to speak with African or Central Asian computer users but I imagine their experiences are similar to Indian, Russian or perhaps Turkish users. Ok there is also hitech Asia (South Korea, ROC and Japan) but that’s a whole another world and China is much more likely to star resembling that than the US.

            For example Germans, Irish and Scandinavians have strikingly similar approach to IT (and similar market trends) which are then pretty different than US (the land of, for example, still strong Apple mindshare dominance in mobile). Most people from various parts of the developing world I had the chance to discuss computing with, share strikingly similar experiences and trends etc. Obviously I don’t have hard data, just bunches of anecdotal evidence, but they do align with data (do look at market trends in developing world, they show powerful dominance of MS and cheap PC laptops, that Chromebooks still can’t touch as they didn’t hit the price low enough in those markets)

          • Sean Lumly

            You cannot know the future, you can only guess as to what you think will happen. I think Chromebooks will increase in marketshare in aggregate in developing countries, you do not. Time will tell.

            Again, lets follow up in two years to see if sales have plateau’d or shrunk from Chromebooks in developing countries.

          • bmarkovic

            Sorry, I didn’t mean to imply I know the future, only that I know the environment in those countries and can, thus, make a decent educated guess how things will move there. Obviously, massive hemorrhaging of mindshare that is happening to Microsoft on all fronts (tho Win10 is somewhat amortizing it as of lately) is playing a role here and it’s effects are rippling to all shores.

            Again, I’m not sure what you’re arguing here. If you think Chromebooks will gain *some* marketshare, they likely will, just how much some is? Also if you’re arguing they’ll plateau within confidents of that some, they also likely will. What I’m arguing is that their “bite” into Wintel notebook market will be order of magnitude less significant in the developing countries than in the developed world, the curve of that bite into the market will look the same, only at a different scale.

          • Sean Lumly

            I understand, my apology. And yes, I’m guessing they will both gain in share against Wintel in the developing world. I agree with your prediction that if there is to be a future gain, it will be slight to start, but I further predict that it will continue to grow given time.

          • bmarkovic

            Another thing I constantly think will happen, but fail to mention, is that if ChromeOS/Chomebooks really gain significant traction, that it will likely just mean more OS-less boxes sold in developing world. Not sure if you’re aware, but these markets are chock full of OS-less laptops or laptops with preinstalled FreeDOS, not kidding, this things are 2:1 against computers with preinstalled Windows, and are actually cheaper.

            Perhaps in the future pirated ChromeOS or if we’re lucky, truly free ChromiumOS will some day end up on those, but it could also mean Linux-proper distros that can support ChromeOS-like experience using bits of Chromium and ChromiumOS will become a viable option as well.

          • Sean Lumly

            I wasn’t aware of the FreeDOS computers, that is very interesting! I think that whatever happens, Google will be very aggressive (as they have been with Android, balloon-wireless, etc) trying to muscle into these territories. It will be interesting to see if their efforts pan out.

            I see ARM really changing the cost-equation for new laptops, which may have an impact on second-hand costs. But likely the largest impetus standing in the way of Chromebooks (beyond the ultra-inexpensive computers that you mentioned) will likely be network access as ChromeOS is a network-heavy OS!

          • knuthf

            Just bear in mind that in general, the US market is 10 years later than Europe in core technologies. Long after India and most developing countries when it comes to adapting new technology.
            MS used to have a footprint in emerging markets, when they were unable to stop piracy. Now these use Linux – like Ubuntu instead, and as you know, Linux is developed in – Europe.

      • sggodsell

        Apple has nothing that schools would consider saving them money. Chromebooks are better in the education system, because of the maintenance and low cost issues. Windows and Macs require much more maintenance which drives up costs.

    • Marco Fritz

      I bought a Chromebook at the end of last year.
      After using it for almost 5 months, I resold it due to privacy concerns.

      Need an example: Google Cloud Print.
      A friend of mine enlightened me: “I would never even consider sending my prints to foreign servers on the web, before my printer starts printing.”

      Now back on Ubuntu – with some peace of mind.

      • Deckard_Cain

        You could’ve kept your Chromebook and just installed Ubuntu on it…

        • Jeňa Kočí

          don’t ruin his day :)

        • Biky Alex

          It depends… If it was an ARM Chromebook, he would have a harder time, but if it was a normal Intel Chromebook, that would be very easy.

        • Marco Fritz

          I did install Ubuntu 14.04 LTS via Crouton.
          However, with just 16GB SSD space, I wasn’t able to store all my files locally.
          Furthermore, I ran into trouble with some keyboard shortcuts, which appeared to be reserved by Chrome OS.
          I didn’t manage to reasign them (e.g. keyboard layout switch), so I sold it on ebay.

      • Yes, I had one for a while but it wasn’t for me. Ended up going back to a normal PC laptop and Linux and ditching Google completely.

      • I just looked. At least 5 of the 8 Google Data Centers are in the USA. Given standard network routing, its unlikely your data ever left the USA for either Finland or Belgium.

    • Fatal1ty_93_RUS

      Macbooks? No way man, the power of Apple in the PC market is way ahead of Google’s.

      • Sean Lumly

        Time will tell!

        • Fatal1ty_93_RUS

          I suppose

      • I think opensource is the way forward. Windows and MACs will be seriously dented by Chrome. This is my prediction.

        • knuthf

          Mac and MacOS is Unix BSD and you can easily move code from Linux to Mac. So Apple will not feel this much – except that they will see a demand to make cheaper computers.
          I agree with you entirely, Open Source is the future.

    • Biky Alex

      Macs (and Apple devices in general) are becoming prestige devices. They start to be more like a trend for people with money (or people who want to show-off). There are some music and video production apps there, but still, most mac/iphone/ipad users have them only for basic things that a chromebook could do anyway (at least in Europe).

      Chromebooks have a place in the market, but like some guy said earlier, they can’t beat 2nd hand laptops (but most of the time is because they’re so cheap that 2nd hand laptops lower the prices lol). Where I live people only know Windows and are very sticked to them (even though chromebooks would do just as well). I’m more of an Ubuntu guy myself though….

      • Stefan van Aalst

        How many Macs run without Windows and or ms office? How many Mac users use chrome?

        • Biky Alex

          I don’t understand those questions (or rather, I don’t understand their purpose). If I had to answer, I only saw tree iMacs and only one didn’t had Windows (I’m talking about my country, by the way), but I’ve seen a lot of Macbooks and Macbook Airs that ran without Windows. As for which browser they use, it depends, it’s mixed with Safari, Chrome and Opera. None of those had MS Office, because around here, people don’t really need it (only some small companies do).

        • Kaitain

          I would imagine most Mac owners do not dual-boot Windows. For most people there would be no point in running a slightly inferior OS, unless they were compelled to do so to run e.g. Visual Studio.

          I use Chrome on a Mac (well, most Macs; on my older ones with less memory Opera is the best choice).

        • knuthf

          Macs that us MS Office = MANY, very many of the MS Office licenses is on MacOS.
          Mac that run Chrome = NONE just academics

      • knuthf

        Apple with Mac are running fast in Europe where the users can afford the slightly more expensive equipment to purchase to avoid the fuss and bugs of Windows.
        My Mac has both MS Office installed and OpenOffice and Pages / Numbers. MS Office had an advantage some years ago when it was dominant, now it turns up to have bugs in its own file formats – like layers displayed in wrong order.
        Apple has also evicted “Visual Studio” from the preferred system development platform in Europe, Xcode from Apple is preferred.
        Many of the applications made for Linux can very easily be ported to Mac and Chrome – see Homebrew: “Synaptic” for Mac with KDE.

        • Biky Alex

          That might be true in western Europe, but here in middle east and eastern Europe, people can’t really afford any kind of Macs. There are some people who have Macs and Macbooks, but there are few. I mentioned this before in this comment section (look 2 comments below this). I don’t say they’re not good or something, but they’re too expensive for what they can do.

          • knuthf

            I think that the princes in Saudi Arabia can afford 4 MacBook Pro with gezillion TB of SSD. What you forget is that in some of these countries there is a large portion of the population that is vastly more wealthy than in the US. In the US, it is just a couple of thousands that compare to Don Trump, in these countries they are vastly more numerous. In the “Big Bang Theory” they have it right. They could not care less about the price, as long as they can surf without being traced, no viruses and malware. The difference is that there are in some countries people that are very poor – and they cannot afford a computer. But they use mobile phones, and the Chinese are now producing Android phones that enables these people to participate in the Internet economy – like mobile payment. This has escaped the media in the US – where companies come up with services like payment, unaware that the peasants in these countries have depended on this service for decades. They cannot afford to be online as on Chrome, and use Ubuntu or variants. These installs on computers that the Chinese produce to less than $150.

          • Kaitain

            GDP per capita is higher in the USA than in almost all of Europe, and computers are cheaper as well.

          • knuthf

            Stick to international statistics, and it is the other way around. Nothing falls faster than an illusion once it is exposed.

          • Kaitain

            In Europe, only Luxembourg, Norway and Switzerland rank above the USA. Denmark and Sweden if you’re going by median income (the USA has a significantly larger gini coefficient than most European countries).

  • Dragonbite

    I am seeing a number of announcements about schools getting Chromebooks (in the 1,000s!) which I am sure have helped influence these numbers.

    All of the OSs are fighting for getting into schools. Get the kids familiar and comfortable while they are young, and these same people will eventually be buying for corporations, other educational institutions and for personal use. Plus they will be promoting them other places (Government?)

    • Biky Alex

      Yea, I’d rather see Ubuntu or Edubuntu on those Chromebooks than Chrome itself lol.

      • knuthf

        So, let us make a variant of Ubuntu / Mint that installs on Chrome. I have made one for ARM multi-core running Android 4.2, I suspect someone has done it already. Check the Mint community, there was a discussion there about this.

        • Biky Alex

          You can already run Ubuntu/Mint/any other linux distro on Intel Chromebooks. As for ARM chromebooks, I think there are already some Ubuntu ports (and soon, Snappy Personal should be easier to install).

          • knuthf

            I stated in another post that I have participated in one port on Linux Mint to ARM, and most of this is in the Ubuntu repositories. There is a variant that is released for Android, that builds an image on the SD card and allows you to run Ubuntu on any Android – but you need “root” access. This will also work on Chrome. A variant can be downloaded on Google Play.

  • dourscot

    Huge fan of Chromebooks but these figures are misleading – Chromebooks have exceeded Windows in B2B *channels*. That is almost certainly a demand-management issue driven by seasonal education sales and does not accord to sales popularity more generally in business.

    The only number that counts are actual B2B sales. All the evidence is that, with the exception of education, Chromebook sales to businesses remain very small.

    • The figures are the figures and we mention explicitly that they are B2B sales.

      Second line: “US Business-to-business (B2B) sales […]”
      Second to last para: “Although business sales do not include sales to regular consumers[…]”

      And the very final paragraph explains what B2B is and how it differs from B2C.

    • systemBuilder

      Google itself is buying more and more Chromebook devices for its employees, in fact, employees are choosing these devices for their economy and good battery life. I have a prototype devide that I will likely choose when my current laptop is kaput.

  • USA, B2B, shipment, percentages in the back-to-school period. I can’t get too excited about this.

    • shyisc

      So a new generation of kids will grow up with something that isn’t Windows.

      • John McCourt

        neh they will just install Windows 10

        • Charlie Whitman

          They can’t install Windows 10. I don’t know of any Chromebooks that any version of Windows will run on other than as a virtual machine inside a Linux installation. If someone is doing that, I don’t think we have to worry much about their computer literacy.

          • knuthf

            You can run Windows in an emulator on most Linux distributions, and MacOS. Why not Android and Chrome? It is open source, so it is just to compile and link “Wine”.

        • shyisc

          Even if they have the technical skills required, why would they go through the hassle for a machine that’s not powerful enough to play their favorite games?

          Growing up with something that isn’t Windows doesn’t necessarily mean they won’t use Windows, only that they will use something else in addition. So either they will become fixated on one OS that isn’t Windows, or they will get used to using more than one OS. Either way it is good for opening the market for more competition.

      • If you think about it, it can be a game changer and Google is playing it very well and cleverly.

        And why not, I am a Chromebook fan after leaving my 20 years of companionship with Windows :))

  • Elliot Aidam

    this is only happening because parents want inexpensive laptops for students who won’t be gaming and photo or video editing on them

    • systemBuilder

      And why not? There is no bigger time waster on earth than … photo editing.

    • Deckard_Cain

      Photo editing can be done with Snapseed. Kids don’t need much more than that.

    • SLM82

      Or cause windows sucks that much. I’ve seen windows notebooks the same price as chromebooks still can. I don’t like either but it makes me happy to know this

      • knuthf

        I see that the Chinese produce tablet PC (tablets with a detachable keyboard) that almost compare in price with Androids. The good thing then is that the BIOS makes it easy to install Linux like Ubuntu / Mint. They know that people are willing to pay more for Windows. Just to be on the safe side some of these “dual boots”.

      • SuppliedRelic

        Like it or not, Windows is the most successful operating system on the market. Have you taken a look at the market share lately?

        • Kaitain

          And Justin Bieber is the most successful music star.

    • sggodsell

      Its also happening because people don’t have to maintain their Chromebooks, unlike Windows which requires virus software. As well as extra maintenance and or software to lock them down. This also adds to the cost of using Windows. Chromebooks require none of that, so they are cheaper in the long run.

      • John McCourt

        windows comes with Windows Defender (an antivirus) built in. Linux also has a number of well known security vulnerabilities so it’s pretty dumb to not have anything to check if a computer has been exploited. Someone could hijack your computer and you wouldn’t even know because there is no software to inform you. Also if you think malware needs to have root access to do harm on linux you are wrong. A standard non-root account on linux has access to documents, can use the internet/network connection, can have startup scripts and much more. So even if the hijacker doesnt get root they can still do alot of damage. Dont assume that Linux is safe just because it lacks malware /exploit detection by default.

        • birkowashere

          A lot of times websites are hacked because hackers get login details by compromising the site owners windows PC..

        • knuthf

          Name one “security violation” that can be exploited on a Linux distribution. Some things are possible only because of flaws in the OS that has been there all the time. We know them, and MS saw the possibility of creating an industry or consulting market. If you want to pay those consultants now – do so and use Windows. But if you are sick and tired of “security exploits” – get an OS where it is possible to lock the door. Also once in, you need to have “execution privileges” on a script that you intend to run. So how to you get that? – Using “sudo” – privileged access. Windows is insecure because it has little built-in security. Linux and iOS (Unix BSD) is where the Internet was developed and is made and designed to run secure. Most devices on the Internet use this OS, so of course, most of the websites that are exploited runs Linux because very, very few can run Windows. Not even Microsoft´s own servers are all Windows.

      • Kaitain

        Cheaper, lighter, faster, easier.

    • noobermin

      Not really, this is a trend in business to business trends, not consumer buys.

  • Elliot Aidam

    I would only enjoy this if chrome OS became an offline OS as well

    • jsebean

      I use it offline. But what is there to do offline anyway of a super low end computer?

      • knuthf

        Kingsoft, the Chinese giant offers browser and an Office Suite that compares well to MS Office.

  • Sicofante

    US data doesn’t reflect very well world trends. I’m a bit tired of this.

    Apple is nowhere near Google on phones outside the US. Google is nowhere near to Microsoft on laptops outside the US. Etc., etc., etc.

    Stop using US figures as if they were THE market indicator. They’re not.

    • TheBagging Man

      I know what you’re saying with chrome os and Windows but as for iphones they are the most popular phones in all 1st world countries. You can’t compare ios to android daily when there are 3 different iphones being sold and 3000 android variants. Btw I’m an android user…

      • knuthf

        Oh – where is your statistics? The iPhone is popular in the US – and has a fair market share outside the US. This is available statistics from the GSM consortium. But one problem is that the iPhone 6 is really not a GSM phone – it violates GSM security grossly. There is just one Android as seen from the net, but maybe 3000 models. It vastly outpace the iPhone.

        • TheBagging Man

          Meh. Just opinion dude. In Australia The majority of people own iphones. Whether or not they violate GSM security means nothing to me. Just saying that iphones sell more in US, Australia, New Zealand, UK and Canada. The only first world countries aside from Scandinavian countries.

          • knuthf

            Before you say more stupid things: Every phone has an IMEI code in it, that identifies the handset, – the manufacturer and model. All the Australian operators know just how many iPhone 6s is used on their network at any time, because they follow the models to see if they have specific troubles. So, when you call in and say you have problems with your phone and poor coverage, they will see “Yes we can see that, your iPhone 5s has problems switching fast enough between the 900MHz band and 2.1Ghz – its something we know and you have to live with. If this is a major problem, we have just now a special offer on Samsung Galaxy 6 and can recommend this.” Don´t argue, they know. And these numbers are reported to the GSM consortium, where fault rates on models are known. If then the iPhone has a problem, it is possible for them to avoid the issue, and tell IN to avoid this and that on specific models. Many Australians own iPhones, but my impression is that it is a free country.

          • TheBagging Man

            Rar rar rar… What ever dude, I’m just stating the facts.

          • Sicofante

            “US, Australia, New Zealand, UK and Canada. The only first world countries aside from Scandinavian countries.”

            Ha, ha, ha. Nice one. Now we can safely ignore the rest of your comment.

          • mabus83

            TIL that Germany is a developing country.

            But yeah, The UK, NZ, Australia, and Canada plus Scandinavia (Sweden, Norway and Denmark) have a combined population of less than 145 mil, or about the same as just Germany and France put together. That’s hardly the entire developed world. The OECD (minus medium-HDI countries Mexico and Turkey) has a population of 1 bil.

    • calden74

      This is a US based site focusing on the US market. If you want a site based on world wide statistics, start one. By the way, I’m in Switzerland.

      • Sicofante

        This site is not US based and it is not focused on the US market.