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ASUS Chromebook C300 Colors Hit US Nov 22, Pre-Orders Live

asus c300 in blueIf you’ve been holding out for a colorful ASUS C300 Chromebook to hit the states, your patience will shortly be rewarded.

Amazon US is taking pre-orders for two of the three color variants, blue and red, with an anticipated release date of November 22, 2014.

It was back in May that we first showed you the vivid color accents ASUS had planned. Six months on and we’re only just beginning to see the devices eke out to brighten up the market, with Australia being the first to put them on sale.

As of this week US buyers can place a pre-order for the 2GB C300 in either blue or red (yellow still missing in action).

Personality aside, the hardware on offer remains largely consistent with that found in the regular black version that went on sale back in the summer.

  • 13.3-inch HD LED Display (1366×768)
  • Intel N2830 CPU @ 2.16GHz (Dual Core, Bay Trail)
  • 2GB RAM
  • 16GB eMMC storage
  • 10 hour batteryasus c300 red

There’s also 802.11ac Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.0 LE and the usual assembly of USB, audio jack, SD Card and HDMI ports.

I expect we’ll see a 4GB RAM model with double the storage arrive in due course. It remains to be seen if the quad-core Intel Celeron N2930 model (with a mobile SIM tray) will also touch down in the land of the free.

Priced Bright

Pricing for the C300s remains on the dot with the less colorful model (and the 11.6-inch C200) at just $249. Expect to see that slip a little as we head into the holiday season.

Want in? Mosey on over to Amazon. Global shipping is not, as of writing, offered on this model — so Brits, hold tight! 

Pre-Order ASUS C300 Chromebook (Blue) on Amazon.com Pre-Order ASUS C300 Chromebook (Red) on Amazon.com

  • Boothy

    “1366×768” – 13.3 inch screen – Pass!

  • Finally! Too bad the C300 isn’t that great. On the basis of reviews and discus comments, I have yet to find a chromebook that is a clear winner (sans the pixel, but who can afford that?). I really love that blue, though… so tempting despite the lackluster reviews.

    Wait, there’s a quadcore model? Now that’s interesting!

    • David Gabel

      Agreed about the Pixel. Even though I could afford it, it is still too much money for a ‘terminal’ (as it needs the web for the majority of it’s usefulness), as I could get a very nice laptop for the price. Though for what these are, I’d still take one over one of those old netbooks any day of the week.

      • dourscot

        Chromebooks aren’t terminals, they are cloud computers. They also have an offline mode.

        As for PCs, I haven’t seriously tried using one offline for years but I’m guessing they’d be pretty useless too.

    • dourscot

      Not really – I own the C300 and it’s a great laptop for general use. Perfectly fast, completely silent and cool and the battery life beats Windows laptops costing five times the price. It even charges rapidly.

      • Really? I’ve read a number of reviews which indicated that it hesitates/lags a bit with just a few tabs open. Is this not true in your experience? I’m not one of those people that has 50 tabs open at once, but if it can’t handle 3-5 tabs at once, then what’s the point?

    • Anonymoused

      Toshiba CB 2, anyone? It and the pixel are clear winners.

      • Maybe when the price comes down, I’ll consider it. A decent Chromebook shouldn’t cost more than $250 imo, but I’m on a student budget. I’ve actually heard good things about the Dell chromebook which is slightly cheaper, but I have had horrible experiences with Dell, so I’m hesitant to buy one.

        • Anonymoused

          I planned to check it out on/around Black Friday and cyber monday. I’m on a “work full time to pay rent/food and maybe someday afford school” budget and tbh $330 seems all right to me; you have to remember that IPS and decent speakers don’t come free. $300 would be the perfect price, $279 would make me ecstatic.

  • Vin

    Seriously, we keep getting the same Chromebook: 13.3 or 11 inches; crappy display; 2 or 4 GB of RAM and 16 or 32 GB of SSD. Sure maybe there’s a processor improvement, but is that really critical? We need a significant upgrade in the number of mid-level and high-level machines.

    Cheapness is no longer the real selling point of a Chromebook. And, if you have nothing to really upgrade to, why buy a new machine? This is going to be dangerous for the Chromebook manufacturers; too many machines of the same type so each machine will have lower sales as the market if diluted.

    • Boothy

      Agreed.
      And I just get the feeling that as the number of models increases (what feels like weekly), the releases from Google are just getting a little rough at the edges at times, or certain models are left waiting for ages for updates (Chromebox’s recently).
      The number of different configs means that whatever testing is done must be stretched now.

    • dourscot

      Don’t agree at all – the Chromebook doesn’t need huge amount of storage or piles of RAM. Changing that would add cost to no benefit whatsoever.

      The Chromebook is a cloud computer, not a reinvented PC in Google form.

      • Vin

        That is short-sighted. The Chromebook is _currently_ _primarily_ a cloud computer. Yet, as the Chrome OS evolves, more RAM, SSD, and screen size will be needed for doing more serious work. There will be more off-line apps. There will be more serious number crunching to be done and image processing to be done. There will be things which are streamed initially but that will need to be made available offline like movies. Things change and if Chromebooks are just glroified netbooks, I’ll go back to PCs or Macs. I just don’t want to deal with their bullshit and want a better ecosystem experience.

        • David Gabel

          Not only that, but ChromeOS has a Linux core meaning that a fuller OS could be in the pipeline depending on if they want to invest in that long term, or if Android will fill that segment, or maybe even if they plan to converge both into one OS later on as well.

  • Question for those that own an 11″ Chromebook: do you find the screen size too small? I would be going from a 15.3″ screen to an 11″ screen, I’m worried I might be very disappointed. I don’t care about the viewing angles, I already have to tilt the screen “just so” on my Asus laptop, so I’m used to it. Also, do you feel the resolution (136×768) is sufficient, given the screen size? I owned a tiny VAIO netbook back in 2007 that has that same resolution, it wasn’t as bad as I thought it would be.

    • Boothy

      1366×768 on an 11″ is alright actually. Just gets a bit pixilated as it goes up in screen size.
      My (personal) wishlist is for another option with a 16:10 screen size. I have that on my old (ish) 550, and it’s great. As so much of ChromeOS is web based that little bit of vertical hight makes a big difference.
      This is 12″ with 1280×800 and it’s a great little screen. It’s actually much better than my old 15.6 (1366×768) screen to work on.

    • David Gabel

      I’d never go below a 13″ screen. Anything smaller and you’re better off with a large (10-12 inch) tablet instead.

      • Anonymoused

        ..unless you don’t like the form factor.

        • David Gabel

          Perhaps, but in terms of usability of the OS, a tablet in those sizes would give you more than just a browser to use, and perhaps more storage.

          • Mi Pen

            I actually like my 11.6inch chromebook. Its perfect size to fit in a small bag. PS I also have a 9.7 inch tablet, but my chromebook has a better keyboard and is far faster for real work on the go. I don’t find 11.6 inches to be too small on the contrary it actually feels like a perfect fit.

          • David Gabel

            Guess people are finally changing then. I remember not that long ago when the 7 – 10 inch netbooks came out and how everyone complained about how they were too small for any real work.. and now today people seem to cope better with the smaller (below 13 inch) screens.

          • Mi Pen

            well the resolutions were terrible on the old netbooks and 8 or 10inches was too low. But 11.6inches is big enough to fit a web page on reasonably well and the resolutions are far higher than most of the old netbooks. 11.6inches is perfect but I would agree that any less for a laptop is horrible.

    • dourscot

      Personally, not for mobile use. A 13.3inch is about right for fixed use.

      The bigger battle is to find a decent keyboard.

    • Anonymoused

      HP 11 owner — no, I don’t find it too small. It’s perfect for long bus rides, sitting on a crowded couch, carrying without any pain to my shoulders/needing to buy a new, larger bag… my CB has an IPS screen so I don’t have a screen-tilt problem. 13″+ seems large for a laptop for me. I’m a smallish person though, so YMMV.

  • dourscot

    A great machine (I have the C300 and the battery life is sensational) but the colours aren’t quite keyed right.

  • Carl Draper

    Baytrail? 2GB RAM? no thanks! The quad core Celeron though, with 4GB RAM would be much more interesting! I have the older Chromebook 14 with 4GB RAM and i can’t believe HP only put 2GB in the new version and an Nvidia CPU too.

    • Zactu

      Agree. Manufactures should be putting 4gb ram min and I like to see 32gb storage min as well. I don’t recommend anyone buying junk with 2gb ram.

  • Mi Pen

    I have a Acer 710 and its still lightning fast with 2gb ram. Don’t compare to windows bloat machines. 2gb system ram is more than enough for chrome os.